Integrated protein production hub approved for Somerset

Source: https://bit.ly/2AX63xN

Plans for a multi million dollar integrated protein production hub at Coominya has been awarded preliminary approval by Somerset Regional Council.

The Brisbane Valley Protein Precinct master plan aims to satisfy Asia’s appetite for quality meat and will help position the region for a buoyant future.

Brisbane Valley Protein managing director, Duncan Brown, welcomed Somerset Regional Council’s strong endorsement of the precinct which he said would help provide a future opportunity in food production for generations to come.

“The Somerset Region already punches above its weight in terms of producing quality meat products for the world and food production accounts for more employment than any other sector,” Mr Brown said.

“Council’s support means this future is secure with nearly 3000 acres set aside for projects that support the growing, processing and exporting of quality products as well as training of young people for a future in food and hospitality initiatives that will continue to put the region on the map as a food tourism destination.

“Our hope is the precinct becomes a hub for conceiving and realising food production dreams.”

The master plan is set on 2500 acres near the township of Coominya and features 10 sub-areas accommodating a range of uses from food-based tourism, training, meat processing and livestock production.

Mr Brown said the preliminary approval reflected the strong community support for the project and meant the “heavy lifting” had been done up front in terms of environmental modelling.

“We went through a 60 day community consultation process and didn’t receive a single negative submission,” he said.

“We’d like to thank the community for their belief in the project and the positive outcomes we all believe it can deliver in the area.

“The approval provides a major shot of confidence for investors and others seeking to bring the precinct to life.”

Somerset Mayor Graeme Lehmann said the development was the first dedicated protein production hub in Australia.

“This development is well planned, strategic and will bring huge benefits to the region,” Cr Lehmann said.

“This is great news for our community in that it will bring more jobs to the region and showcase Somerset on the international stage through production, exports and hospitality modelling.”

The master planned area will include a variety of rural and food production land uses that could include poultry, quail, game birds, cattle protein precincts including food processing, hatcheries and a growing farm.

Also contained within the master plan is the establishment of a produce pavilion, restaurants, markets, food hospitality areas including state-of-the-art training facilities, tourist park and a function facility.

The project will be rolled out in stages, each stage subject to a code assessable development application, with stage one of the precinct – an integrated, ‘hatch to dispatch’ quail business – completed in August this year and the first exports of quail to Asia happening last week.

Safika’s Brisbane Valley positioned for strong export future

The Brisbane Valley Protein Precinct has taken an important step towards satisfying Asia’s appetite for quality meat. Australia’s Somerset Regional Council has granted preliminary approval for the company’s masterplan, a strong endorsement of the project.

The masterplan is set on 2500 acres (1011 hectares) near the town of Coominya and features ten sub areas accommodating a range of uses from food-based tourism, training, meat processing and livestock production. The project will be rolled out in stages, each stage subject to a code assessible development application.

Brisbane Valley Protein managing director, Duncan Brown, welcomed the announcement by the council which he said would help provide future opportunities in food production for generations to come.

Safika’s Saki Macozoma said that Brisbane Valley is an important component in Safika’s strategy of expanding its agricultural interests. “Brisbane Valley is working to fulfil an important need for Asia and doing so in a way that will create jobs and add value,” he said.

Marc Ber, of Safika International, said that hard work and meticulous planning by the team is paying off. “Safika and Brisbane Valley Protein are creating a business hub that is going to play an important role in job creation and food provision for generations to come, adding value to all our stakeholders.”

Duncan Brown said: “The Somerset Region already punches above its weight in terms of producing quality meat products for the world and food production accounts for more employment than any other sector,” Mr Brown said.

“Council’s support means this future is secure. We have set aside nearly 3000 acres (1214 hectares) for projects that support the growing, processing and exporting of quality products. We are also training young people for a future in food and hospitality initiatives that will continue to put the region on the map as a food tourism destination.”

Mr Brown said the preliminary approval reflected the strong community support for the project and meant the “heavy lifting” had been done up front in terms of environmental modelling.

“We went through a 60-day community consultation process and didn’t receive a single negative submission. We’d like to thank the community for its belief in the project and the positive outcomes we all believe it can deliver in the area. The approval provides a major shot of confidence for investors and others seeking to bring the precinct to life.”

Stage 1 of the precinct – an integrated, ‘hatch to dispatch’ quail business – was completed in August this year with the first exports of quail to Asia happening last week.

“This project is helping put the Brisbane valley and Somerset Region on the map.”

Historic first export to Hong Kong for Safika company

Safika’s Australian Brisbane Valley Holdings has exported its first shipment of quails to Hong Kong, a milestone for what is to become a major export hub for Safika’s agricultural enterprises.

 

Quail processing venture launched

Australian cabinet minister Cameron Dick and Saki Macozoma enjoying a taste of quail

Australia’s Brisbane Valley Protein Precinct, in which Safika has a significant investment, has launched its new quail processing plant. It was officially opened by Australia’s State Development Minister Cameron Dick. Safika’s chairman Saki Macozoma was present at the event.

The R20-million plant is the first stage of the protein precinct master plan which will be completed in four stages.

“This is a great example of the private sector working with government to create jobs and economic development in Queensland,” Minister Dick said.

Brisbane Valley Protein has established hatching, growing and processing infrastructure – the processing plant is the first export orientated quail abattoir in Queensland.

“We are very excited by this venture. Already it is providing employment for locals but it means the Brisbane Valley name will be gracing the menus of some of the top nations in the world,” Mr. Brown said.

Incredible journey of Bay’s man of steel

Nelson Mandela leads a delegation of the ANC at the Union Buildings in the 1990s . With him are Jacob Zuma (with Mandela’s briefcase), Saki Macozoma and Joe Nhlanhla. Jay Naidoo and Alec Erwin can be seen in the background

Macozoma still interested in PE rail links that export his ore

Ngoasheng and Macozoma acknowledged for their support of disadvantaged students


Safika’s chairman, Saki Macozoma and chief executive, Moss Ngoasheng have been acknowledged by the Black Professionals Scholarship Fund (BPSF) for their regular and unwavering support for educational initiatives in South Africa.

BPSF head Tyson Sithole made the presentations at a special event, which raised more than R1-million to fund tertiary studies of gifted but disadvantaged students.

From Safika’s inception, Moss and Saki have financially supported and initiated a variety of educational scholarship, bursary and mentorship programmes, often preferring to do so anonymously.

The Black Professionals Scholarship Fund (BPSF) was formed in 2014 by young black professionals as a response to the challenge of a poor education system in South Africa. Members of the BPSF contribute to a central fund from their salaries each month and provide mentorship to students to help them manage the transition from high school to university.

Saki has served as chairman of the University Council of the Witwatersrand and of the Council for Higher Education. He is a member of the Board of Governors of Rhodes University.


Sakumzi Macozoma interview on CNN Marketplace Africa

Local boy made good, Oswin Slade, is trying to make a difference in South Africa.

JP-Duminy-and-Oswin-Slade-2U1A9818

Oswin Slade, chief executive of Safika group’s UNICOM technology company, presents a cheque to support the development of young South African cricketers to JP Duminy’s JP21 project.

He is bringing international business to South Africa’s economy and donating to South African cricket.

It was 42 years ago when Oswin, disgusted by apartheid, left his Stellenbosch home, flew to Australia and tore up his South African passport. Now, many years later, Oswin returned to Cape Town to bring to the country some of the world’s most sophisticated communication devices.

“Democracy in South Africa is a wonderful thing and I am proud to see how my birth country has developed. For it to flourish, I believe it needs a solid economy and international trade,” said Oswin, Chief Executive of Australian telecommunications company UNICOM. “If by providing state-of-the-art communications devices, I can give back to the land of my birth, it will be a dream come true.”

Oswin is also looking forward to meeting his cousin cricketer Charl Langerveldt They share a common passion for cricket and to mark the reunion Unicom is donating R25, 000 to JP Duminy’s JP21 project for under 21 cricket, a project that underscores values of respect, kindness, transparency and integrity

Oswin said that when apartheid ended, it was too late for him to return to South Africa, “I have an Australian wife and kids and it just seemed too much to uproot them. Throughout the years, though, I always dreamed the day would come when I could help.”

Websites

http://www.unicompl.com
https://tmt.knect365.com/africacom/

Grassroots shareholders celebrate black-controlled manganese mine’s R300m dividend

A flashback to 2003 when Ntsimbintle's Saki Macozoma, seen holding some of the hard grey manganese metal mined from the sands of Kalahari, turned the first sod at the Tshipi mine.

A flashback to 2003 when Ntsimbintle’s Saki Macozoma, seen holding some of the hard grey manganese metal mined from the sands of Kalahari, turned the first sod at the Tshipi mine.

Against the background of rising calls for radical economic transformation in South Africa’s mining sector, particularly transformation that benefits the country’s communities, grassroots shareholders of the black-controlled Ntsimbintle were last week able to celebrate the Northern Cape manganese mining company’s latest R300-million dividend payout – and also look to a new Kalahari manganese project on the horizon.

Ntsimbintle, headed by struggle veteran Saki Macozoma who was imprisoned on Robben Island from 1976 to 1982, is a manganese mining and exploration business born out of South Africa’s own transformation in 2002, when the government announced it wanted to broaden ownership of the country’s strategic resources.

The one-time Robben Island prisoner has been at the forefront of developing Tshipi é Ntle Manganese Mining’s 2.4-million-ton-a-year Tshipi Borwa mine, and Creamer Media’s Mining Weekly Online was in the sands of the Kalahari with him at its sod turning in 2003, along with Pallinghurst mining luminary Brian Gilbertson, who was instrumental in turning South Africa’s former Gencor mining house into BHP Billiton, the world’s biggest mining company.

Pallinghurst company Jupiter is a 49.9% shareholder of Tshipi é Ntle and the positioning of Tshipi Borwa in the lowest cost quartile at a time of rising manganese prices, resulted in Tshipi making its maiden R1-billion distribution in March.

With the manganese price remaining strong over the past few months, Tshipi has agreed to distribute a further R500-million to its shareholders in September, which will result in a total shareholder return of R1.5-billion this year.

Tshipi is one of the newest mines in the 35-km-long and 15-km-wide manganese belt of the Kalahari, which is to the hard grey metal what the Bushveld Complex is to platinum and what the Witwatersand gold basin was to gold.

During the first four months of this year, Tshipi achieved monthly production volumes capable of supporting an output of more than three-million tonnes of manganese ore a year and exported more than any other producer in South Africa.

The 500 km2 manganese field that hosts it is said to contain 20-billion tons of manganese ore at grades of 20% to 48% manganese, compared with China’s largely-below-20% grade, with lower quality manganese requiring more electricity.

Technically and geologically, South Africa has superb manganese that others can only dream about – large, thick, shallow, homogenous, continuous seams.

Tshipi’s close-to-surface manganese is mined relatively cheaply, with all the initial R1.7-billion funding that kicked the project off coming in the form of foreign equity capital, in the realisation that steel needs manganese and hardly any development takes place in the world without steel.

Ntsimbintle says in a release that dignitaries, shareholders, business luminaries and VIP guests gathered in Kathu on June 22 to honour its communities, particularly those surrounding the mine, and to commemorate the broad-based forming of Ntsimbintle in 2003 by nine black groups that have since broadened to 16, many of them from within Northern Cape’s grassroots communities.

The John Taolo Gaetsewe Developmental Trust – previously known as the Kgalagadi Rural Poverty Node Charitable Trust and  made up of members directly from the Kgalagadi district – focuses on youth development, people living with disabilities, HIV/Aids, poverty alleviation, and women and children.

This trust, a 14.44% shareholder of Ntsimbintle, is chaired by Cynthia Mogodi, who played a leading Ntsimbintle directorship role even during Mining Weekly Online’s 2003 visit.

To date, the John Taolo Gaetsewe Developmental Trust has received dividend payments from Ntsimbintle of R46.2-million, which has greatly empowered the trust to carry out its mandate of championing sustainable socioeconomic solutions for Kgalagadi’s poor and needy.

Among the trust’s key socioeconomic initiatives, says Ntsimbintle in the release, are a human resource development foundation, bursary scheme, multipurpose centre and community radio station.

The mine also does its share in socioeconomic development through its social and labour plan, with some of its projects including a teacher development programme, a bulk water supply project, an enterprise development project, learnership programmes and university bursaries.

What is being looked forward to is the 51% Ntsimbintle-owned Mokala Manganese, which has an 80-million-tonne manganese resource, 12-million tonnes of which is amenable to opencast mining.

A feasibility study has been completed on the proposed project and the award of a mining right is imminent.

Ntsimbintle has also reached agreement with Lehating Mining and its major shareholder, Traxys Projects LP, to amalgamate into one mine the Lehating mining right and a future mining right within the Wessels prospecting area.

The upcoming Lehating/Khwara amalgamation area hosts one of the few remaining high-grade (49%) manganese deposits in the Kalahari manganese field.

“It’s an honour to be part of such an incredible journey of transformation, and to finally see the vast mineral wealth of our country being shared more equitably among the people than ever in our history,” says Macozoma, 60, whose first job in 1982 was as a soils analyst with Blasting & Excavating in Port Elizabeth, the city of his birth.

But his analyst tenure was shortlived as the police did not want him to have access to explosives, which led to his joining of the South African Council of Churches.

He later hit the high spots as Transnet’s head and sat on the boards of some of South Africa’s top corporate companies.

Celebrating transformation where it’s needed most

Source: http://www.miningne.ws/2017/06/26/celebrating-transformation-where-its-needed-most/

The calls for radical economic transformation in South Africa’s mining sector, particularly transformation that favours the country’s communities, are rising in their urgency, their frustration and their exasperation.

So it was with no small measure of pride that dignitaries, shareholders, business luminaries, and VIP guests including Inside Mining, gathered on 22 June 2017 at the Kalahari Country Club in Kathu, Northern Cape to celebrate the success of a truly transformed South African mining investment company.

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