A partnership rooted in true empowerment

Safika Holdings is honoured to be part of Ditikeni’s story

Safika Holdings, our shareholders, board, subsidiaries and all our employees, are proud to have partnered with Ditikeni from the very early days when challenges in the non profit organisation (NPO) sector seemed insurmountable.

In the euphoria of the dawn of democracy, many of us were oblivious to the threat our great struggle organisations were facing. They were being denuded of their most talented people as the new state built its civil service and policy capacity.

The foreign funding that many of these organisations had come to rely on was drying up.

It was not being replaced by the new progressive state in financial or service terms.

The consequence was that thousands of beneficiaries of these programmes and projects were abandoned at the very time many of their compatriots were enjoying the democratic dividend.

How could this dangerous situation be arrested and resources redirected at the NPOS that had been the backbone of service delivery to these people?

A bright spark lit the firmament when someone identified that the struggle NPOS could get together and create a company and a trust that would provide the broadbased element of empowerment in transformation dealmaking.

The idea is so simple and yet so effective that had many dealmakers of those heady days of empowerment deals embraced Ditikeni, the empowerment story could have been different both in substance and narrative.

We are grateful that Ditikeni saw in Safika Holdings a company that believes in true empowerment.

Our first substantial deal that we did with Ditikeni was the Stanlib deal with Standard Bank and Liberty about two decades ago.

The capacity to distribute resources in an accountable and sustainable way is what attracted us to Ditikeni.

Unlike many so-called broadbased structures that go to war among themselves as soon as the first cent flows in, working with Ditikeni has been a pleasure.

We at Safika salute Ditikeni, a steady and supportive business partner over the two decades of its service to the NPO sector.

We look forward to working with Ditikeni to build new businesses, create new commercial opportunities and employment prospects while its constituent organisations do what they are great at … providing service to our people when society and the state fails them.

SAFIKA RESOURCES DIVERSIFIES INTO ZINC AND COPPER

Safika Resources has announced that it has acquired nine percent of Australia’s Orion Minerals’ R4-billion (AUD408-million) project to reopen the Prieska copper and zinc mine in South Africa’s Northern Cape.

Safika Resources’ chairman Saki Macozoma said the acquisition is in line with the company’s policy of diversifying into copper and zinc in the near term. Safika Resources is already the leading exporter of manganese ore in South Africa through its Tshipi Borwa mine in the Northern Cape. “With Prieska, we look forward to replicating our success in manganese,” he said.

The Prieska mine was closed 28 years ago due to low commodity prices, but improved market conditions and improved modern mining methods now make its reopening an attractive option for investors. A recent bankable feasibility study showed that the R4-bn project will be paid back within three years from the start of production, with a post-tax IRR of 33%.

Justin Pitt, Safika Resources’ chief executive says that with planned all-in sustaining costs of US$3,773/t copper equivalent and market consensus long term copper and zinc prices of US$6,575/tonne and US$2,338/tonne respectively, the all-in-sustaining margin is expected to be in the order of 44%.

Pitt said that Safika’s nine per cent stake was acquired through it taking a 44,72% stake in BEE Holdco (Prieska), a BEE Entrepreneur owned company which owns 20% of the project. “Safika’s impeccable credentials made it an ideal partner for Orion when it sought to restructure its BEE ownership to comply with the requirements of the 2018 Mining Charter,” Pitt explained.

Pitt added that Safika Resources has considerable mining and exploration rights in the Northern Cape, and the Prieska transaction is part of the company’s expansion strategy in the region.

The Prieska mine will be restarted in what Australia’s Orion calls its “foundation phase”, a period lasting 10 years and delivering zinc and copper in concentrate, generating nearly R33bn of revenue.

Not only does the foundation phase exploit only 20,8Mt of the 30,5Mt of the known reserves and resources, but Orion says there is potential for extensions to the deposit and fresh discoveries around the mine.

The 2.4-million tonnes a year underground and opencast mining operation and processing plant will deliver 189,000 tonnes of copper and 580,000 tonnes of zinc in separate concentrate streams during the first 10 years.

The funding for the project, which peaks at around R3,8Bn (AUD3,78Bn), will be raised in part equity from its primary listing in Sydney and its secondary listing in Johannesburg, along with debt.

Big birds catalyst for new quail processing facility in Queensland

By Cassandra Hough | Source

The cooked chook might be a staple in the Australian diet, but Brisbane Valley poultry farmer Duncan Brown is looking to the more exotic quail to tempt consumers’ tastebuds and overseas markets.

When Mr Brown sat down to a quail dish a couple of years ago, he was taken aback by the size of the bird.

“I’ve always liked quail, but always found it a bit fiddly and difficult to eat,” he said.

“I had a memorable meal at a Sydney restaurant and the quail was twice as big as what I was accustomed to, served as a main meal, and I traced that back to a farmer in the Hunter Valley.

“After two years’ discussion we agreed to be in partnership, so growing these quail that are, instead of your typical 180 to 200 grams, they’re 300 to 450 grams and that’s purely because over many years this farmer has been selecting bigger birds.

“So I guess in a sense it’s a unique breed of quail that chefs like in Asia and here because they can put it on the menu as a main meal instead of an entree.”

As a result, Mr Brown and his sister, Selena Gomersell, have built a $2 million quail processing plant at Coominya in south-east Queensland.

The plant has been Safe Food accredited and they have now applied for export certification to Singapore and Hong Kong.

Brisbane Valley Protein Precinct quail manager Vassie Govender holds a quail. (Supplied: Agi Davis Photography)

The quail processing plant employs an additional 10 people with hopes that 20 to 30 people would eventually be employed.

But Mr Brown estimated that number could grow to 200 jobs if the protein precinct was approved.

Full production will start in early August but it is the tip of the iceberg for the siblings.

The grand plan is to build a dedicated ‘protein precinct’ on their land, which would incorporate other meat processing and food tourism.

Mr Brown said he hoped the precinct would put the region on the world’s gourmet food map and the quail processing was just the beginning.

“We have a Section 242 application before the State and the local Somerset Council to have a masterplan for our 1,011 hectares to effectively turn it into a protein precinct that will cater for future development in terms of training around food, meat processing, and food-based tourism,” he said.

“Our vision is to turn that parcel of land into a hub that produces protein for the global market, particularly Asia.

“Not just employment. We’ve had some great conversations with the local high schools, there’s a big emphasis on work-based training, and we really want to tap into that and help young people in the area see there’s a good future in food.”

Integrated protein production hub approved for Somerset

Source: https://bit.ly/2AX63xN

Plans for a multi million dollar integrated protein production hub at Coominya has been awarded preliminary approval by Somerset Regional Council.

The Brisbane Valley Protein Precinct master plan aims to satisfy Asia’s appetite for quality meat and will help position the region for a buoyant future.

Brisbane Valley Protein managing director, Duncan Brown, welcomed Somerset Regional Council’s strong endorsement of the precinct which he said would help provide a future opportunity in food production for generations to come.

“The Somerset Region already punches above its weight in terms of producing quality meat products for the world and food production accounts for more employment than any other sector,” Mr Brown said.

“Council’s support means this future is secure with nearly 3000 acres set aside for projects that support the growing, processing and exporting of quality products as well as training of young people for a future in food and hospitality initiatives that will continue to put the region on the map as a food tourism destination.

“Our hope is the precinct becomes a hub for conceiving and realising food production dreams.”

The master plan is set on 2500 acres near the township of Coominya and features 10 sub-areas accommodating a range of uses from food-based tourism, training, meat processing and livestock production.

Mr Brown said the preliminary approval reflected the strong community support for the project and meant the “heavy lifting” had been done up front in terms of environmental modelling.

“We went through a 60 day community consultation process and didn’t receive a single negative submission,” he said.

“We’d like to thank the community for their belief in the project and the positive outcomes we all believe it can deliver in the area.

“The approval provides a major shot of confidence for investors and others seeking to bring the precinct to life.”

Somerset Mayor Graeme Lehmann said the development was the first dedicated protein production hub in Australia.

“This development is well planned, strategic and will bring huge benefits to the region,” Cr Lehmann said.

“This is great news for our community in that it will bring more jobs to the region and showcase Somerset on the international stage through production, exports and hospitality modelling.”

The master planned area will include a variety of rural and food production land uses that could include poultry, quail, game birds, cattle protein precincts including food processing, hatcheries and a growing farm.

Also contained within the master plan is the establishment of a produce pavilion, restaurants, markets, food hospitality areas including state-of-the-art training facilities, tourist park and a function facility.

The project will be rolled out in stages, each stage subject to a code assessable development application, with stage one of the precinct – an integrated, ‘hatch to dispatch’ quail business – completed in August this year and the first exports of quail to Asia happening last week.

Safika’s Brisbane Valley positioned for strong export future

The Brisbane Valley Protein Precinct has taken an important step towards satisfying Asia’s appetite for quality meat. Australia’s Somerset Regional Council has granted preliminary approval for the company’s masterplan, a strong endorsement of the project.

The masterplan is set on 2500 acres (1011 hectares) near the town of Coominya and features ten sub areas accommodating a range of uses from food-based tourism, training, meat processing and livestock production. The project will be rolled out in stages, each stage subject to a code assessible development application.

Brisbane Valley Protein managing director, Duncan Brown, welcomed the announcement by the council which he said would help provide future opportunities in food production for generations to come.

Safika’s Saki Macozoma said that Brisbane Valley is an important component in Safika’s strategy of expanding its agricultural interests. “Brisbane Valley is working to fulfil an important need for Asia and doing so in a way that will create jobs and add value,” he said.

Marc Ber, of Safika International, said that hard work and meticulous planning by the team is paying off. “Safika and Brisbane Valley Protein are creating a business hub that is going to play an important role in job creation and food provision for generations to come, adding value to all our stakeholders.”

Duncan Brown said: “The Somerset Region already punches above its weight in terms of producing quality meat products for the world and food production accounts for more employment than any other sector,” Mr Brown said.

“Council’s support means this future is secure. We have set aside nearly 3000 acres (1214 hectares) for projects that support the growing, processing and exporting of quality products. We are also training young people for a future in food and hospitality initiatives that will continue to put the region on the map as a food tourism destination.”

Mr Brown said the preliminary approval reflected the strong community support for the project and meant the “heavy lifting” had been done up front in terms of environmental modelling.

“We went through a 60-day community consultation process and didn’t receive a single negative submission. We’d like to thank the community for its belief in the project and the positive outcomes we all believe it can deliver in the area. The approval provides a major shot of confidence for investors and others seeking to bring the precinct to life.”

Stage 1 of the precinct – an integrated, ‘hatch to dispatch’ quail business – was completed in August this year with the first exports of quail to Asia happening last week.

“This project is helping put the Brisbane valley and Somerset Region on the map.”

Historic first export to Hong Kong for Safika company

Safika’s Australian Brisbane Valley Holdings has exported its first shipment of quails to Hong Kong, a milestone for what is to become a major export hub for Safika’s agricultural enterprises.

 

Quail processing venture launched

Australian cabinet minister Cameron Dick and Saki Macozoma enjoying a taste of quail

Australia’s Brisbane Valley Protein Precinct, in which Safika has a significant investment, has launched its new quail processing plant. It was officially opened by Australia’s State Development Minister Cameron Dick. Safika’s chairman Saki Macozoma was present at the event.

The R20-million plant is the first stage of the protein precinct master plan which will be completed in four stages.

“This is a great example of the private sector working with government to create jobs and economic development in Queensland,” Minister Dick said.

Brisbane Valley Protein has established hatching, growing and processing infrastructure – the processing plant is the first export orientated quail abattoir in Queensland.

“We are very excited by this venture. Already it is providing employment for locals but it means the Brisbane Valley name will be gracing the menus of some of the top nations in the world,” Mr. Brown said.

Incredible journey of Bay’s man of steel

Nelson Mandela leads a delegation of the ANC at the Union Buildings in the 1990s . With him are Jacob Zuma (with Mandela’s briefcase), Saki Macozoma and Joe Nhlanhla. Jay Naidoo and Alec Erwin can be seen in the background

Macozoma still interested in PE rail links that export his ore

Ngoasheng and Macozoma acknowledged for their support of disadvantaged students


Safika’s chairman, Saki Macozoma and chief executive, Moss Ngoasheng have been acknowledged by the Black Professionals Scholarship Fund (BPSF) for their regular and unwavering support for educational initiatives in South Africa.

BPSF head Tyson Sithole made the presentations at a special event, which raised more than R1-million to fund tertiary studies of gifted but disadvantaged students.

From Safika’s inception, Moss and Saki have financially supported and initiated a variety of educational scholarship, bursary and mentorship programmes, often preferring to do so anonymously.

The Black Professionals Scholarship Fund (BPSF) was formed in 2014 by young black professionals as a response to the challenge of a poor education system in South Africa. Members of the BPSF contribute to a central fund from their salaries each month and provide mentorship to students to help them manage the transition from high school to university.

Saki has served as chairman of the University Council of the Witwatersrand and of the Council for Higher Education. He is a member of the Board of Governors of Rhodes University.


Sakumzi Macozoma interview on CNN Marketplace Africa